CALLING THE GHOSTS – 李成恩 Li Cheng’en

seele1

Li Cheng’en

CALLING THE GHOSTS

In a hotel in a dream

very softly, I hear the ghosts.

“I give my flesh to the mud for keeping.

When I need it, please give it back!

I give my bones to the stones for keeping.

When I need them, please give them back!

I give my blood to the rivers for keeping.

When I need it, please give it back!

I give my brains to the mountain for keeping.

When I need it, please give it back!

I give my eyes to the sun and the moon.

When I need them, please give them back!

I give my warmth to the stove for keeping.

When I need it, please give it back!

Only the heart I have to carry … ”

After I wake up

I open the window

and see the mountain slowly moving.

One tiny stream down from the snow

like it’s flowing in my dream.

Has my soul

gone wandering?

Or is it back?

I retain

one dusty heart.

But my soul,

where is it hidden?

Who gives it back?

Tr. MW, Oct. 2013

Li Cheng’en, born in the 1980s. Published poetry, essays and a novel.

As soon as I read this, I was reminded of Woeser 唯色, the Tibetan poet. Didn’t know Li Cheng’en was also a woman. All those verses with “I give” could be “I gave”. In the Chinese, there is no difference. The sentence construction is also unique. It is the “ba-construction”. Sometimes the “ba” is a “jiang”, but not here. Anyway, it’s a construction often discussed in Chinese grammar. Literally I think it’s like saying “I take my flesh and give it to the mud for keeping”. Maybe you could also just say “I put my flesh into the mud”, or into the soil. But why would you call on the mud to hold it for you?  MW

My translation was originally based on this picture version sent around on Tencent Weibo and Sina Weibo as part of Yi Sha‘s regular New Century Poetry Canon. Li Cheng’en has since told me about a mistake in the copying process. In the Weibo image “warmth” or literally body warmth occurs twice. Li Cheng’en says it should be “eyes” instead of warmth the first time. So originally I had “I give my warmth to the sun and the moon. When I need it, please give it back!” I like both versions. Somehow I’m glad about the mistake. Makes for closer attention.

In German, I first had “ich borg’ meine wärme der sonne dem mond – wenn ich sie brauche, gebt mir’s zurück!”.

I am still not sure about how to translate all these “ba-construction” – verses in German. Now they sound stranger than before, but this is how I had them first. The German equivalents of “please give it back” or “please give them back” sound very colloquial. It’s not standard grammar. Some people don’t like that. Maybe I’ll find a better version later.

MW

Li Cheng’en

GEISTERBESCHWÖRUNG

im traum im hotel

hör’ ich ein lied

“ich nehme mein fleisch und geb’ es dem lehm.

wenn ich es brauche, gib mir’s zurück!

ich nehm’ meine knochen und gib sie den steinen.

wenn ich sie brauche, gebt mir’s zurück!

ich nehme mein blut und geb es den flüssen.

wenn ich es brauche, gebt mir’s zurück!

ich nehme mein hirn und geb es dem berg.

wenn ich es brauche, gib mir’s zurück.

ich borg’ meine augen der sonne dem mond –

wenn ich sie brauche, gebt mir’s zurück.

ich nehm’ meine wärme und geb sie dem herd

wenn ich sie brauche, gib mir’s zurück.

nur das herz muss ich selbst mit mir tragen … ”

ich wache auf

öffne das fenster

seh’ eine kleine bewegung am berg.

ein dünner bach

aus meinem traum.

ist es meine

wandelnde seele?

kommt sie zurück?

ich behalte

ein staubiges herz.

doch meine seele

wo ist sie verborgen?

wer gibt sie zurück?

Übersetzt von Martin Winter im Oktober 2013

Li Cheng’en, geboren in den 1980er Jahren. Publizierte einen Roman, Gedichtbände, Essays.

Picture by Sara Bernal

Picture by Sara Bernal

李成恩

招魂歌咒

我在旅馆的梦里

隐隐听到了招魂歌咒

“我把肉体寄存给泥土

要的时候你可得还啊

我把骨头寄存给石头

要的时候你可得还啊

我把鲜血寄存给江水

要的时候你可得还啊

我把脑浆寄存给雪山

要的时候你可得还啊

我把眼睛寄存给日月

要的时候你可得还啊

我把体温寄存给炉火

要的时候你可得还啊

只有心我得自己带走… …”

我醒来后

推开窗户

看见雪山缓缓移动

一条薄薄的河流

像是从我的梦里流出

我的魂魄

游走了?

还是回来了?

我守住了

一颗沾满灰尘的心

但我的魂魄

寄存在哪里?

谁又能还我?

Li Cheng’en

GEISTERBESCHWÖRUNG

im traum im hotel

hör’ ich ein lied

“ich habe mein fleisch dem lehm anvertraut.

wenn ich es brauche, gib’s mir zurück!

ich hab’ meine knochen den steinen gegeben.

wenn ich sie brauche, gebt mir’s zurück!

ich habe mein blut den flüssen gegeben.

wenn ich es brauche, gebt mir’s zurück!

ich hab’ mein gehirn dem berg anvertraut.

wenn ich es brauche, gib mir’s zurück.

ich borg’ meine wärme der sonne dem mond –

wenn ich sie brauche, gebt mir’s zurück.

ich nehm’ meine wärme und geb sie dem herd

wenn ich sie brauche, gib mir’s zurück.

nur das herz muss ich selbst mit mir tragen … ”

ich wache auf

öffne das fenster

seh’ eine kleine bewegung am berg.

ein dünner bach

aus meinem traum.

ist es meine

wandelnde seele?

kommt sie zurück?

ich behalte

ein staubiges herz.

doch meine seele

wo ist sie verborgen?

wer gibt sie zurück?

Übersetzt von Martin Winter im Oktober 2013

Li Cheng’en, geboren in den 1980er Jahren. Publizierte einen Roman, Gedichtbände, Essays.

Advertisements

标签: , , , , , , , ,

发表评论

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com 徽标

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  更改 )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  更改 )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  更改 )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  更改 )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


%d 博主赞过: