Posts Tagged ‘essays’

MY OWN POETRY – 游若昕 You Ruoxin

二月 17, 2021

You Ruoxin
MY OWN POETRY

In my review material
is a Beijing middle school essay topic,
writing it
feels like a poem,
just about 20 lines.
I am very glad,
this isn’t easy to get.
Makes me think,
even if middle school exams in Fujian
let you
write poetry,
maybe I would be worse off.
Wouldn’t get even one point,
could be.
Because here down south,
teachers love
Ah …
Ahh …
That kind of poetry.

1/17/21
Translated by Martin Winter in February 2021

新世纪诗典作品联展#游若昕#(24.0)

伊沙:本诗所写多么真实!梦回唐朝又如何?考诗是真,平仄对仗,李白即使上考场,也是落第的命。古往今来,大诗人不是考出来的。大年初七,有请90、00、10三代诗人中总推荐数最高的游若昕向典中这三代”年轻诗人”拜年!

况禹点评《新诗典》游若昕《我写的诗》:照片里的若昕一天比一天大,诗也在随着稳步推进,而且一直保持着高标准。是什么样的环境和教育,导致我国的青少年对诗歌的认识自动分成两个阵营(广大的新诗八股思维和小众的自由精英思维)?这个大问题限于篇幅,在此不做讨论。本诗触及的是另一个大话题——在以上大背景下年轻作者的自我身份确认——带着孤独和源于天赋的骄傲

黎雪梅读《新世纪诗典》之游若昕《我写的诗》:本诗如实道出了口语诗的现状。以前中考作文题目都会有“体裁不限,诗歌除外”的要求,近几年虽有所改观,允许写诗歌,但写诗歌的学生依然寥寥无几,因为会写的学生太少了。偶尔有几个能写出来的也纯粹是为了应付考试,还要符合老师们眼中诗的样子:满篇“啊啊啊”地空洞抒情,意象也无非是蓝天白云外加青草和花朵,毫无新意可言。教师对诗歌的认知和审美尚且如此,更不要说学生了。所以口语诗的前景可以说是“道阻且长”,还需要同仁们继续努力,写出更多更好、经得起岁月考验的作品,才能让我们的诗路走得更高更远。

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

张小云:读游若昕《我写的诗》

“我想”vs“啊……”
“转念一想”vs“啊……”
理性思惟的思辨的vs随情绪而发的

可以后者吗?当然可以
但后者诸类生灵共有
前者却惟人独有
本就思惟而言便见高下
假使平等视之那岂能全倾“阿”派

游若昕碰到的作文题
触及所谓五千年文明地盘
必须面对
却少有人思考的重大课题

在物质化功用至上形而下主导的时代
更当珍惜和开发世人正在遗弃的
大脑处理器与心性共同作用
所具备的宝藏
谢谢游若昕提供了如此别有的
“诗考”

2021.2.17

Murong Xuecun, Yu Hua, Liu Zhenyun, Bob Dylan and Rivers of Bablyon

八月 5, 2012

I don’t think Murong Xuecun exaggerates, like one commentator suggested on the MCLC list. Yes, you could encompass many alarming, saddening, embarrassing stories in one speech in other places than China, and people do it all the time, naming names, practices, products. The difference is that in China you will be silenced more swiftly and harshly. Yes, there are exceptions.

Does Mo Yan revel in cruelty like Dan Brown? Does Yu Hua make better use of the cruel parts in his novels? Ok, I’m an interested party, I can’t really say. Would be interesting to analyze in detail. Mo Yan’s novels are great works, at least those I have read, he has written a lot. Deep, cathartic, even accusing use of cruel events and structures. I love Yu Hua’s tone. And I associate Liu Zhenyun in Remember 1942, and Murong Xuecun’s Sky and Autumn speech.

We had Jeremiah in church today, along with that story where a guy goes abroad and gives his gold and silver to his servants. The ones that receive more trade with it, and when their lord comes back, they can give him double. The one who received very little buries it, and when the lord comes back, he digs it out and says, I know you are a harsh governor and reap where you haven’t sown, so I was afraid to lose what you gave me, and kept it double safe. His colleagues get to join the big party, and are rewarded with great posts. He is cast out into the darkness, which is filled with howling and chattering teeth. It’s a horrible story. Yes, it’s a parable, and if you have very little reason for faith, you should still risk it and try to make more, because if you bury it deep in your heart you might lose the little trust you had and received and be cast out into the darkness. But if you are the one who has reason to be afraid, how can you trust your lords? The ones who have more and get more have it easy. Even if they lose everything, they are often rewarded – those powerful managers and functionaries. And if there are enough of those who are cast out, and they get organized, maybe some bishops or other lords might dangle from lamp posts. A Hussite reading, said my wife. Yeah, maybe. No shortage of horrible stories in Chinese literature, like in the Bible.

Jeremiah is even worse, it’s a much bigger story, infinitely more horrible. And there is a detail, not in the Jeremiah parts used in church today, but in the songs in exile. By the rivers of Babylon, where we sat down, where we wept when we remembered Zion. And in the end the singer wishes, or the singers wish they will one day brutally kill the children of the oppressors. That’s the detail in Murong Xuecun’s speech I was thinking about.

The calling of Jeremiah, where he says he’s too young, and God says he has to go and obey, and open his mouth, and God will put His words into his mouth, and he will be set above nations and kingdoms, so he can pluck out and demolish, ruin and destroy, as well as plant and build. The preacher said she thought of parting and setting off to other posts, and how the Marschallin in Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s and Richard Strauss’ Rosenkavalier sings of what she will have to give up. What a horrible comparison! There is nothing light in Jeremiah. There are no waltzes. Ok, Rivers of Babylon, yes. But with Jeremiah, if you have to mention Austrian writers, Franz Werfel would be much more apt. Werfel was Jewish and used Jeremiah, a lot. Ok, she did mention, much too briefly how nobody would heed Jeremiah, and that it’s actually the most terrible story.

Anyway, when I heard Jeremiah, I thought of Bob Dylan. Masters of War. “How much do I know, to talk out of turn? You might say that I’m young; you might say I’m unlearned. But there is one thing I know, though I’m younger than you, it’s that Jesus would never forgive what you do. […] And I’ll watch while you’re lowered onto your deathbed, and I’ll stand on your grave and make sure that you’re dead.” I don’t know if Dylan thought of Nixon and Kissinger explicitly, when he wrote this song. America’s Vietnam War was raging, and I think the song came out when Nixon and Kissinger where in power. Anyway, there is that Monty Python song about Kissinger. Very explicit. Dylan and Monty Python would not be able to sing these songs in China on stage today, to say nothing about what Chinese artists can do. No, Murong Xuecun doesn’t exaggerate.

x and y

x was cruel

butt is sore

y was able

and suave.

both loved culture

both destroyed

hundred million

butts are cold

MW         March 2007

Yes, I thought of Mao and Nixon, and their sidekicks. But x and y could stand for many people, and could be mentioned anywhere, at least today. Almost anywhere, probably. Anyway, it’s about smoking, you know. Littering. OK, enough for today.


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