Posts Tagged ‘civil society’

ALLGEMEINE ERKLÄRUNG DER MENSCHENRECHTE

七月 29, 2018

ALLGEMEINE ERKLÄRUNG DER MENSCHENRECHTE

(u.a. für den Österreichischen Bundespräsidenten Alexander van der Bellen)

.

 

ALLGEMEINE ERKLÄRUNG DER MENSCHENRECHTE

alle menschen sind f
alle menschen sind ff
alle menschen sind fff
alle menschen sind fffr
alle menschen sind fffrr
alle menschen sind fffrrr

ei!!!

geboren

als vogel,

als wild.

alle haben dieselben würdenträger
und die gleichen rechten
von geburt an. nicht wahr?

alle sind mit vernunft begabt
und mit gewissen,
außer dem innenminister.

sie sollen einander begegnen
in brüderlichkeit. ach ja. 1948.
nach dem krieg
nach der shoah
auch zwei chinesen waren dabei.

muss man die menschenrechte erklären?
muss man oder frau die menschen erklären?
wahrscheinlich schon immer in jeder familie
in jedem dorf oder haushalt
jeder und jedem
an jedem sonn-und feiertag,
an jedem werktag.

1948
1984
2018
2081

und so weiter in alle ewigkeit amen.

MW Juli 2018

.

 

.

Advertisements

HALLOWEEN IN BUDAPEST 卍靈節在布达佩斯

十一月 2, 2016

cwlxmyxxeai7oar cwlxusdxeaimfr7 cwl0acvxgaeo5pc cwl07j4weaez-5i

cam01234 cam01233 cam01232 cam01231 cam01230 cam012292

HALLOWEEN IN BUDAPEST

Halloween in Budapest
Do you need to call out the ghosts?
Do you need to call out the ghosts?
In Parliament
Brightly lit along the Danube
Do you need to call out the ghosts?
In Vienna
In Budapest
In many cities
Many, many towns
thousands of towns
thousands of thousands
brightly lit along the Danube
Dohany Synagogue
Greatest in Europe
Status Quo Synagogue
By Otto Wagner
On Rumbach Street
Actually many buildings are left
All over Europe
Yes, there are Jews
In Budapest
Yes, there are people
Do we need to call out the ghosts?
Everyone knows
Along the Danube
Behind the Parliament
Greatest in Europe?
It’s very big
Behind the Parliament
Along the Danube
They lined them up
Several places
Along the Danube
Just a few months
Hungarian Fascists
Finally able
1944
Fall ’44
German troops everywhere
Last few months of the war
Until the first month of ’45
Here in this city
Everyone knows
Hungarian Fascists
Established the ghetto
They passed laws against Jews
In Parliament
In 1920
Basically everyone knows
1944
Hundreds of thousands
in a few months
Around 600,000
Killed in Auschwitz
Along the Danube
Behind the Parliament
Several places
Szabadsag ter
On Freedom Square
There’s a new monument
For the victims
It says
German occupation
Doesn’t say that in German
Doesn’t say that in English
Any other language
For the victims
Only these words
Even in Hebrew
Only the victims
Victims of German occupation
Written in Hungarian
Only in Hungarian
Erected in secret
Protests from the beginning
Pebbles, chairs,
a few wires, photos
pebbles with names
and so on
Everyone knows
Over 300 Million
Hungarian money
Erected in secret
Law passed in Parliament
December 31st, 2013
Protests from the beginning
Szabadsag ter
Liberty Square
Halloween in Budapest
Do you need to call out the ghosts?
There are people enough
In Budapest
In many cities
Many, many cities
Towns and cities
All over Europe
Brightly lit along the Danube
Everyone knows
Actually many buildings are left
All over Europe
Halloween in Budapest
Do we need to call out the ghosts?
Everyone knows
Halloween is for kids
We have kids in Vienna
Kids like to dress up
For Halloween
Let them have fun
Nothing wrong
Halloween
My daughter knows
Austrian Fascists
Ghosts are alive
Zombies are real
Wish it was all
Pumpkins for kids
Halloween in Budapest
Greatest town
Along the Danube
Since Roman times
Basically
Everyone knows

MW October 31st, 2016

14906903_10210481304886847_8210415856268275291_n 14595822_10210481301566764_270989926782868330_n 14721451_10210481300726743_5176712894211865374_n 14639782_10210481308326933_3548060683881209599_n 14915444_10210481308246931_3394367412859447034_n 14915717_10210481307486912_8526800222922596626_n 14581409_10210481307406910_3053713031861293868_n 14925262_10210481306926898_7738326507589833519_n 14910483_10210481306486887_8001266828958303970_n 14925447_10210481306006875_1418241118152943268_n 14915380_10210481305486862_8954021510541493912_n 14907647_10210481305046851_1333219363853747328_nimg_20161030_103951_032 img_20161030_104027_125 img_20161030_104540_841 img_20161030_110157_706 img_20161030_121434_940 img_20161030_140705_999 img_20161031_120014_062img_20161030_102503_728 img_20161030_102529_222 img_20161030_102542_257 img_20161030_102601_668 img_20161030_102641_633 img_20161030_102702_991 img_20161030_102748_727

AUSTRIAN FEDERAL CHANCELLOR CHICKEN: HOCH DIE INTERNATIONALE FEIGHEIT!

三月 15, 2016

CAM01085

BUNDESKANZLER FEIGMANN

feigmann ist ein solidarischer mensch
genau wie die zeitung
genau wie das fernsehen
die herrinnen bundesminister
hoch die internationale feigheit
wir haben die balkan-route verstopft
jetzt stopfen wir die italien-route
wir sind ja mittendrin
wir sind österreich-ungarn

MW März 2016

AUSTRIAN FEDERAL CHANCELLOR CHICKEN

chancellor chicken is all solidarity
he loves the papers
he loves the tv
he loves his fellow interior ministers
hail international cowardice!
we have blocked the balkan route
now let us seal the italian corridor
let us block ourselves all over europe
first and foremost 
austro-hungary!

MW March 2016

BALL

二月 18, 2014

BALL

es hat lange gedauert
warum erst jetzt
am ball ist jetzt
die öffentlichkeit
am 8. mai
sind sie schon weg
die schlagenden
beispiele
argumente gründe beweise
sind sie schon weg
es hat lange gedauert
warum erst jetzt
am ball sind jetzt
die öffentlichkeit
alle anderen parteien
jeder aufrechte mensch
jede kämpferin für dieses land

MW Februar 2014

Photo0107

Ai Weiwei in Canada, … almost

八月 12, 2013

The Globe and Mail article quoted by Paul Manfredi is well informed and sympathetic. But it doesn’t spell out any concrete reasons for Ai Weiwei’s singular status. Ai Weiwei’s status, even after his imprisonment, is that of a “princeling”. It seems to be easier to get rid of Bo Xilai. Bo’s father was one of the “eight immortals” of the Communist Party. Ai Weiwei’s father Ai Qing was a persecuted Communist writer, persecuted under Communist rule since the 1940s. Persecuted before, that’s where he got his name. Most of his colleagues denounced each other. Among famous writers, few seem to have been as obstinate as Ai Qing. He was banished to an army town in Xinjiang, a huge city today. There he cleaned toilets, together with little Weiwei. But after Deng Xiaoping came to power in 1978, Ai Qing became an icon. Unlike Bo Xilai and his henchmen, Ai Weiwei did not build labor camps and organ-harvested Falungong-followers. Before he was arrested, Global Times had published many sympathetic articles about his civil rights activism. And even after his abduction and imprisonment at an unknown location, Ai Weiwei gets to keep his comparatively huge house and grounds and most of his fortune. If he was persecuted too much, the main reason for Ai Weiwei’s status would come out too clearly: It would be awkward to discuss his father’s fate in detail. Cultural policy since the 1940s is no secret to anybody in and around the arts in China. But still. Maybe it would come out too clearly how control over art and literature and everything connected to culture was deemed even more important than in other Socialist countries. How idealism had been betrayed again and again, most effectively with broad domestic and international participation in economic growth after 1989. Ai Weiwei is very different from his father Ai Qing in many aspects, as well from his older brother Ai Xuan, who is also a well-known artist in China. But like his father, Ai Weiwei remains an icon of idealism. It would be awkward and politically dangerous to challenge such icons too much and thus revive ideals in a big way.

The Globe and Mail article quoted by Paul Manfredi gives convincing evidence of Ai Weiwei’s civil disobedience and civil rights engagement. Another good recent piece on Ai Weiwei, his imprisonment in 2011 and comparable phenomena elsewhere around the world is a TED-talk by An Xiao Mina.

Ai Weiwei wrote an indignant indictment of the US behaviour in the Snowden case in The Guardian back in June. That was before the plane carrying Bolivia’s president was refused airspace by France, Spain and Italy on US orders on July 3.

China Avantgarde: Paul Manfredi's occasional notes on Chinese art and literature

676x380

I have just discovered, courtesy of the Real Clear Arts, that Ai Weiwei will take questions from attendees of his Ontario exhibition “According to What?” in online chat format.

This exhibition began in 2009 in Mori, Japan. It was reprised this year, starting at the Hirshhorn museum, moving to Indianapolis, stopping now in Ontario en route to Miami and finally Brooklyn.

One wonders how the curators plan to approach this chat experience. Will they be moderating, perhaps even reviewing questions in advance? If so, will they be editing out overtly political content? If not, could this turn into a no-holds-barred discussion of Chinese authoritarianism, political corruption, and all other manner of potentially seditious talk? Obviously, Ai may choose not to answer if he feels line of questioning veering into unsafe territory. But from what we’ve seen of Ai already, self preservation is not the highest…

View original post 202 more words

ANGER

五月 22, 2013

aerger1

AERGER
aerger noch aerger noch aerger noch aerger rauch aerger noch aerger noch aerger jedes jahr fuer jahrzehnte aerger organisation gegen organisation alle machen mit es gibt endlich nach 70 jahren am 8. mai in wien am heldenplatz einen sieg mit musik mit dem heer mit ueberlebenden mit einer freude von beethoven strauss einem tanz einem stolz

MW Mai 2013

aerger

Abstimmung 票決

一月 20, 2013

Für Zivildienst. Und ein Bundesheer mit breiter Bevölkerungsbasis. Wenn überhaupt ein Heer. Aber zur Polizei hab ich kaum Vertrauen. Wir sind neutral. Nicht bei der NATO. Vertrau ich der Polizei? Warum soll ich einem Berufsheer vertrauen? Wir gehen jetzt zur Flüchtlingsdemo. 13:30 beim Volkstheater. Bis dann, alles Gute. Martin Both females  Bock.jpg large Beim Seiteneingang BarBusch

We had a vote about our military in Austria on the weekend. And a demonstration for refugees on hunger strike. Complete with a huge Sachertorte. For the protesters. In commemoration of the “Lichtermeer” against racism and xenophobia in Vienna 20 years ago. I didn’t know if I was going to vote, on Sunday morning. So I got Jackie to call our old friend, Gen. A., her employer in Beijing. The Social Democrats wanted to abolish the draft. But some prominent Social Democrats wanted to keep it, incl. the president. General A. is Social Democrat. But he said if the draft is abolished, they will only get certain segments of the population as recruits. You can do all sorts of other things instead of going to the army. Work in a hospital, teach German to refugees (what I did), even go to Qiqiha’er 齊齊哈爾 for a year. (Here is another report in German, translated from 齊齊哈爾日報)。 It’s not that bad if every healthy young man is required to do something for the community. That was my reasoning. When I did that alternative community service thing, we had to do some training at first for being able to help in case of floods, storms etc. That boat thing was fun. The guy in our group whose parents were in the far-right Freedom Party volunteered and was the first to try and row to an island in the icy Danube. Boat leaked. He didn’t get very far. They sent him to hospital. He was ok. Later on he had to teach German to refugees, helping me. He wasn’t bad, they liked him. He really tried, and I’m quite sure his attitude to refugees etc. changed.

Chen Kohua und Lai Hsiangyin

九月 13, 2012

Click here to read a few poems.

Chen Kohua und Lai Hsiangyin sind im Oktober zu Gast im Literarischen Colloquium Berlin. Außerdem werden sie an der Universität Heidelberg aus ihren Werken lesen.

Chen Kohua und Lai Hsiangyin treten am 29. Oktober um 20 Uhr im Hörsaal SIN 1, Ostasieninstitut Universität Wien auf. (Campus Altes AKH, Hof 2, Eingang 2.3)

Übersetzung: Martin Winter

Eine Veranstaltung des Österreichischen P.E.N. – Clubs

Mit Unterstützung des BMUKK

Murong Xuecun, Yu Hua, Liu Zhenyun, Bob Dylan and Rivers of Bablyon

八月 5, 2012

I don’t think Murong Xuecun exaggerates, like one commentator suggested on the MCLC list. Yes, you could encompass many alarming, saddening, embarrassing stories in one speech in other places than China, and people do it all the time, naming names, practices, products. The difference is that in China you will be silenced more swiftly and harshly. Yes, there are exceptions.

Does Mo Yan revel in cruelty like Dan Brown? Does Yu Hua make better use of the cruel parts in his novels? Ok, I’m an interested party, I can’t really say. Would be interesting to analyze in detail. Mo Yan’s novels are great works, at least those I have read, he has written a lot. Deep, cathartic, even accusing use of cruel events and structures. I love Yu Hua’s tone. And I associate Liu Zhenyun in Remember 1942, and Murong Xuecun’s Sky and Autumn speech.

We had Jeremiah in church today, along with that story where a guy goes abroad and gives his gold and silver to his servants. The ones that receive more trade with it, and when their lord comes back, they can give him double. The one who received very little buries it, and when the lord comes back, he digs it out and says, I know you are a harsh governor and reap where you haven’t sown, so I was afraid to lose what you gave me, and kept it double safe. His colleagues get to join the big party, and are rewarded with great posts. He is cast out into the darkness, which is filled with howling and chattering teeth. It’s a horrible story. Yes, it’s a parable, and if you have very little reason for faith, you should still risk it and try to make more, because if you bury it deep in your heart you might lose the little trust you had and received and be cast out into the darkness. But if you are the one who has reason to be afraid, how can you trust your lords? The ones who have more and get more have it easy. Even if they lose everything, they are often rewarded – those powerful managers and functionaries. And if there are enough of those who are cast out, and they get organized, maybe some bishops or other lords might dangle from lamp posts. A Hussite reading, said my wife. Yeah, maybe. No shortage of horrible stories in Chinese literature, like in the Bible.

Jeremiah is even worse, it’s a much bigger story, infinitely more horrible. And there is a detail, not in the Jeremiah parts used in church today, but in the songs in exile. By the rivers of Babylon, where we sat down, where we wept when we remembered Zion. And in the end the singer wishes, or the singers wish they will one day brutally kill the children of the oppressors. That’s the detail in Murong Xuecun’s speech I was thinking about.

The calling of Jeremiah, where he says he’s too young, and God says he has to go and obey, and open his mouth, and God will put His words into his mouth, and he will be set above nations and kingdoms, so he can pluck out and demolish, ruin and destroy, as well as plant and build. The preacher said she thought of parting and setting off to other posts, and how the Marschallin in Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s and Richard Strauss’ Rosenkavalier sings of what she will have to give up. What a horrible comparison! There is nothing light in Jeremiah. There are no waltzes. Ok, Rivers of Babylon, yes. But with Jeremiah, if you have to mention Austrian writers, Franz Werfel would be much more apt. Werfel was Jewish and used Jeremiah, a lot. Ok, she did mention, much too briefly how nobody would heed Jeremiah, and that it’s actually the most terrible story.

Anyway, when I heard Jeremiah, I thought of Bob Dylan. Masters of War. “How much do I know, to talk out of turn? You might say that I’m young; you might say I’m unlearned. But there is one thing I know, though I’m younger than you, it’s that Jesus would never forgive what you do. […] And I’ll watch while you’re lowered onto your deathbed, and I’ll stand on your grave and make sure that you’re dead.” I don’t know if Dylan thought of Nixon and Kissinger explicitly, when he wrote this song. America’s Vietnam War was raging, and I think the song came out when Nixon and Kissinger where in power. Anyway, there is that Monty Python song about Kissinger. Very explicit. Dylan and Monty Python would not be able to sing these songs in China on stage today, to say nothing about what Chinese artists can do. No, Murong Xuecun doesn’t exaggerate.

x and y

x was cruel

butt is sore

y was able

and suave.

both loved culture

both destroyed

hundred million

butts are cold

MW         March 2007

Yes, I thought of Mao and Nixon, and their sidekicks. But x and y could stand for many people, and could be mentioned anywhere, at least today. Almost anywhere, probably. Anyway, it’s about smoking, you know. Littering. OK, enough for today.

Libya & Other Countries

二月 22, 2011

As rich European countries go, maybe Austria is just as bad as Italy or France. Only smaller, more provincial. Newest anti-foreigner laws package passed on Tuesday, Feb. 22nd, 2011. The protesters in Egypt didn’t really look to America or Western Europe, but to protest experiences in Serbia and such. At least that’s what I remember from reports in the NY Times, among others. A Chinese friend told me he was watching the Arab protests very much,while he was in Europe, because the pictures from Egypt reminded him of Beijing in 1989.

China has had too many so-called revolutions under Mao and a big failure with protests for civil rights and democracy in 1989. But there are many protests in China all the time. Labor unrest, land seizures, health hazards etc.. There may also be a big craving for stability, hence the hesitation to participate in larger protests. The op-ed in the NYT (IHT) by Daniel Bell, designated Western politics professor in Tianjin, was very academic. Or very wishy-washy. Civil rights are universal. No, China’s not so special. Reporters know, especially when they go to see the blind Women’s rights activist lawyer in Shandong and get waylay-ed and beaten. No, nobody cares about supposed academic discussions on why democracy might not work. Yes, people try to lead a good life, individually, for their family, and sometimes they notice the limits, and try to work around them, and many do talk about it. Sorry for the rambling. As I said, rich countries are no beacons. Maybe I am more politics-sensitive than before, since we moved back to Austria from China, after 10 years in Beijing and a few more in other cities. Roger Cohen is right, the EU doesn’t look very good at all these days.

Don't bother

Don't bother

Liu Xiaobo biography events

一月 17, 2011

Liu Xiaobo, the Chinese dissident sentenced to 11 years on Dec.25th 2009 for “inciting subversion“, was awarded the Nobel Peace prize in absentia in Oslo on Dec. 10th, 2010. Liu’s old friend and Independent Chinese PEN co-founder Bei Ling has written a biography of Liu Xiaobo. Bei Ling started off from an essay he wrote in June 1989 in New York, after Liu Xiaobo had been arrested in Beijing in the aftermath of the massacre throughout the city, as People’s Liberation Army troops forced their way through the streets blocked by protesters in the last phase of the demonstrations on Tian’anmen Square. Liu Xiaobo had returned to China from New York and led a hunger strike of intellectuals on the square, supporting the students and Beijing residents in their demands for civil liberties. Bei Ling‘s essay from 1989 was re-published in Chinese in Hongkong and Taiwan in June 2009, and in the German newspaper FAZ on October 12th, 2010, a few days after the Nobel Peace prize announcement from Oslo. Soon after, the German publisher Riva expressed interest in a biography of Liu. Bei Ling had recently written a literary memoir of his years a Beijing underground poet in the 1980s and a literary magazine editor, shuttling between China and foreign countries, in the 1990s. Liu Xiaobo and other old friends such as Liao Yiwu are important figures in Bei Ling’s memoir, to be published by Suhrkamp in Germany this year. So Bei Ling was ready to write his biography of Liu Xiaobo on short notice. It was a crazy idea, but it worked. We worked around the clock in November 2010, and in early December the book hit the shelves. In the first week, from Dec. 9 to 16, it sold 2500 volumes, according to the publisher. Since then, Bei Ling’s biography of Liu Xiaobo has been reviewed in many newspapers, magazines, on TV and radio stations etc. throughout Germany and in neighbouring countries. This month (January 2011), according to the publisher, the book has started to appear on the Spiegel magazine’s bestseller list, the standard list in the German-speaking realm. On January 11th, 2011, a symposion with Bei Ling, Prof. Weigelin-SchwiedrzikProf. Findeisen, Prof. Zhu Jiaming, Dr. Felix Wemheuer and others was held at Vienna University and met with great interest among students and teachers from various faculties. See here …

Liu Xiaobo 劉曉波 discussion at Vienna University 1/11/11, featuring Liu Xiaobo biographer Bei Ling 貝嶺, Prof. Weigelin 魏格林, Prof. Findeisen 馮鐵, Dr. Felix Wemheuer 文浩, Prof. Zhu Jiaming 朱嘉明 and many others. Felix Wemheuer, noted for research into the Great Leap Forward famine, moderated the lively discussion following Bei Ling's lecture.

Liu Xiaobo biographer Bei Ling at Vienna University on Jan. 11th, 2011. Photo: Angelika Burgsteiner


%d 博主赞过: