Posts Tagged ‘opera’

KOSENAME – 亚黎 Ya Li

9月 8, 2021

Ya Li
KOSENAME

mein schwiegervater ist fast 80.
benachrichtigung kritischer zustand,
vormund über seine schwere krankheit,
dann normales krankenzimmer,
wir habens geschafft,
heute kommt er
nach hause.

er liegt im schlafzimmer im bett.
manchmal mit offenen augen, manchmal döst er.
meine schwiegermutter sitzt neben ihm,
ruft ihn Jiang Sancai,
Jiang Sancai,
ich bin deine Alte…

ich hör sie von draußen, ganz erstaunt
es ist das erste mal
dass ich hör wie ihn jemand so nennt
es klingt fast wie in der peking-oper,
die junge frau mit dem jungen mann

Übersetzt von MW im September 2021

新世纪诗典作品联展#亚黎#(2.0)

 

伊沙点评《爱称》:生活的况味、语言的滋味,永远是口语诗的最大优势,也是口语诗的最大贡献。

况禹点评《新诗典》亚黎《爱称》:老龄化的时代无可避免地到来,但它的感觉不是单一的,自有其丰富。

黎雪梅读《新世纪诗典》之亚黎《爱称》:一声声地呼唤,饱含深情和期盼,只为唤醒昏睡的老伴,即使是喊全名,在情感上也丝毫不输现在人们常用的“亲爱的”、“宝贝”“心肝儿”之类的爱称,在他人听来也一样甜蜜而动人。不同时代的人示爱的方式亦有所不同,唯一不变的是真情的流露。本诗写出了老年人真实的情感生活,语言质朴无华却又深挚感人。

黄开兵:夫妻之间,直呼其名,一般有两种情况:一是特别生气时,大声地呵斥;一是关切地轻呼。此诗所写,当是第二种情形。

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

马金山|读亚黎的诗《爱称》的十一条:
1、一首诗,就是一段史事,一段印记;
2、于诗而言,内心深处的响动,在于事物的本身呈现;
3、亚黎,祖籍辽宁,1976年生于黑龙江,长于天津。诗歌、散文、文史、哲理小文、摄影等作品散见于各报刊;
4、亚黎的诗,颇有女性的细腻与敏感,汲取现实生活的场景与细节,在平淡的事物里,激发出无限的活力与诗意;
5、回到本诗,有事件,有情节,有画面,有真情,有细节,在层层深入的逻辑内,生发出无尽的况味与意味;
6、在特定的场景下,一个细腻而富有色彩的场景,掺杂进充满生活的氛围与生命的奇妙感觉,构成了意味深长的口语绽放;
7、平实的语言里,一声声的呼唤,以病床前的画面,将老年人的情感生活展现无疑,真挚而饱含深情;
8、尤其是最后一节,形象而生动的比喻,平添了不少诗的味道与气息,浓郁而又散发着生活最本真的样子;
9、一首一波三折的剧情,一首波澜起伏的旋律,一首情深绵绵的故事,一首滋味幽远的好诗;
10、本诗给予诗人的启示:“写出一个细节容易,写出一连串的细节,且不觉得繁琐难”;
11、生活之诗,爱情之诗,朴实之诗。

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

黄平子读亚黎《爱称》

——《新世纪诗典》3810

爱称

亚黎

年近八旬的公公
从下病危通知书
到重症监护
再到普通病房
一路闯关
今天出院
回来了

躺在卧室床上
时而睁眼时而昏睡
婆婆在一旁呼唤
姜三才
姜三才
我是你老伴儿……

我在外屋惊奇的听着
这是我第一次听
婆婆这么称呼公公
那语腔语调像京剧里
娘子称呼相公

黄平子读诗:“年近八旬的公公”,人物,年龄,身份。“从下病危通知书/到重症监护/再到普通病房/一路闯关/今天出院/回来了”,概括写“公公”的患病和“闯关”过程。“躺在卧室床上/时而睁眼时而昏睡”,“公公”人虽然出院了,身体状况却不尽如人意。两个“时而”,写“公公”身体状况之差。“婆婆在一旁呼唤/姜三才/姜三才/我是你老伴儿……”重症病人最怕出现意识障碍。呼唤可以让患者保持清醒。诗的题目叫《爱称》。婆婆的嘴里,却只是简简单单的一个名字:“姜三才”。这个“爱称”当然不符合年轻人的标准,但是老一辈人能够说出这三个字,已经非常了不起了。“我在外屋惊奇的听着/这是我第一次听/婆婆这么称呼公公”,称呼自己男人的名字,现在看来再普通不过了。但是先前不。在我老家,我奶奶辈的人,有很多一辈子没叫过他男人的名字,称呼的时候,都是“孩子他爸”。我父亲辈的也不少。“我”的惊奇,源于代沟。“那语腔语调像京剧里/娘子称呼相公”,京剧是京剧,生活是生活。“娘子”、“相公”,这些戏剧里的情话,现实生活中是听不到的。
2021年9月8日11点46分

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

Calligraphy by Huang Kaibing

 

 

 

 

 

DRAGON BOAT POETRY FESTIVAL – 玄涛 Xuan Tao

7月 9, 2020

Xuan Tao 玄涛
DRAGON BOAT POETRY FESTIVAL

At the county literature federation poetry event,
theatre people sang Shaanxi opera,
howling their thoats out.
The son of poet Xiao Mai
right away
held his hands over his ears.
I let my eyes wander throughout the hall,
found many people
who also wanted to hold their ears.
But they,
just like me, were afraid
to embarrass the ones on the stage.

6/20/20
Translated by MW, July 2020

 

NATIONAL PARAGONS 2020 – 起子 Qizi

5月 23, 2020

Qizi
NATIONAL PARAGONS 2020

They are valiant fighters against the virus,
cheering for Wuhan,
writing poetry for the Yellow Crane Tower,
painting Professor Middle South Mountain, the national expert.
They are so well-versed in Peking Opera,
trailing long sleeves across their eyes,
which means they are crying.

2/18/2020
Translated by MW, May 2020

 

 

Punks, empathy and torture: Pussy Riot in China and Vienna

8月 17, 2012

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Aug. 25

Daniele Kowalsky showed me a very interesting interview with Jonathan Campbell in the L.A. Review of Books. Jonathan Campbell talks with Jeffrey Wasserstrom about 盤古 Pangu,崔健 Cui Jian,無聊軍隊 Wuliao Jundui and other details of rock music and punk in China.

Unfortunately, I can’t agree with Jonathan that yaogun 摇滚 (Chinese rock music) could galvanize China like Pussy Riot seems to have galvanized opposition in Russia. Cui Jian 崔建 did have some very memorable moments, and people in China do remember them, and they will tell you readily about the parts before 1989, mostly. But those moments in 1989 were so painful in the end that no one knows if there will ever be a similar broad-based protest movement again. 1989 brought hope in Europe. Risk, very risky change, and some very ugly violence in Romania. But overall there was hope, and whatever came out of it, 1989 is generally remembered as a year of wonder. In China it’s a trauma. A wound that is usually covered up, but even China is very much connected to the world nowadays, and the world knows. And there are much deeper and older traumata, which can be accessed and shared via 1989. So in that way, there is hope. Connected to underground music. Like the kind that Liao Yiwu’s 廖亦武 music comes from.

There are parallels, certainly. Parallels between Pussy Riot and Ai Weiwei 艾未未, in the pornography. Parallels in the way of some Ai Weiwei news or other embarrassing news everyone gets to know about, and the dark stuff below. The disappearances, the longer ones, see Gao Zhisheng 高智晟. And the corpses. I learned about the late attorney Sergei Magnitsky via Pussy Riot. He died in jail in 2009, and among people concerned with Russia he is as famous as Gao is in and outside China, which means not so many people want to talk about him or even admit they’ve heard of cases like that. Of course, there are corpses under the carpets in every country. Only China is the oldest 5000 year old one, of course.

Aug. 22

2 years for singing in church. Perfectly absurd. Punk music, controversial art. Public space and religion. Russia, Africa, China. What is art? Depends where you are, what you are, who you are, who is with you. What you believe.

One week ago I read two books. A few months before I got to know a poet. Still haven’t seen her. A Jewish poet in Germany, soon to be teaching in Vienna. Esther Dischereit.

Last month I finally got around to pick up a book that contains many poems I translated. Freedom of writing. Writers in prison. A beautiful anthology, edited by Helmuth Niederle, currently head of Austrian PEN.

Connections. Connected to China. Punk music isn’t all that subversive, not in a big way, usually. What if musicians insult the government on stage. Well, I’ve been to about 300 concerts in China, said Yan Jun. Sometimes someone was screaming something in that direction. But they aren’t big stars. They can be ignored.

Christa Wolf. Stadt der Engel. The Overcoat of Dr. Freud. Long and convoluted. Gems in there. How she was loyal to the Party in 1953. And insisted on protest against Party policy. How and what they hoped in 1989. How and what Germany was and is.

Aug. 21

2 years for singing in church. And many more arrested. It does sound more like China than Russia, doesn’t it? The case of Li Wangyang 李旺陽李汪洋) comes to mind. Li Wangyang died around June 4th 2012 in police care after being released from over 20 years of jail. He was a labor activist in the 1989 protests that ended with the massacre on June 4th in Beijing. Li Wangyang supposedly killed himself, but the police report was disputed in China and in Hong Kong, where tens of thousands of people protested. Li’s relatives and friends are still being persecuted. One has been formally arrested and accused of revealing state secrets, because he photographed Li’s body.

Parallels between Russia and China were drawn in media comments after the verdict in Moscow. One comment wondered whether Russia is trying to emulate China, where the word civil society is banned on the Internet. China has had economic success for decades. People put up with authoritarian one-party rule there, the comment said. But it won’t work in Russia, because the economy depends on natural resources, not on industry. The comment contained the old misunderstanding that in China, government policy and enforced stability have caused economic success. Beijing wants the world to think that, of course. However, the prominent law and economy professors Qin Hui 秦暉 and He Weifang 賀衛方 have been saying for years that the economic miracle of the 1980s depended on a consensus to move away from the Cultural Revolution, as well as on investment from Taiwan, Hong Kong and overseas. After 1989, there has been no comparable social consensus. After 1989, the social drawbacks and the gap between rich and poor may have grown faster than the economy. But the middle class has also grown. Regional protests are frequent but limited. Or the other way ’round. The Internet remains vibrant. With Weibo microblogs inside the Great Firewall, and very much Chinese going on outside. Not because the government initiates it. They let it happen. The economy, the art, the internet. Even protests, when they are against Japan, and/or not too big. And they profit. The oligarchy is the Party.

Religion and more or less independent art have been growing in China, about as much as the social conflicts. Art brings huge profits, so they let it happen. In Russia, Pussy Riot have succeeded in connecting independent art, oppositional politics and religion in a highly visible way. Art, political activism and religion are voluble factors, so much that societies where everyday news has been fixated on finance for at least four years now could almost grow jealous.

Pussy Riot were not mentioned in our church on Sunday, as far as I could tell. I had to look after the children. But the preacher drew on her experiences from jail work. She championed the rights of refugees and was a prominent anti-governmental figure in Austria in the 1990s. Direct relevance for religion in Austrian politics is rare. We had Catholic Austro-Fascism in the 1930s, paving the way for Hitler. Some Protestant Nazis as well. After the Holocaust, religion in Austria has a somewhat undead quality. A bit like traditional opera in China, which is rallying, hopefully.

For international discussion about the relevance of underground art, music and religion, China has Liao Yiwu 廖亦武. And Russia has Pussy Riot.

Photo by Vincent Yu/AP

Aug. 17

Worldwide empathy for Pussy Riot is great. The trial in Moscow ends today, so I don’t know yet if three women have to remain in jail for years after singing in a church. There was a lot of worldwide attention last year as Ai Weiwei 艾未未 was abducted and detained by Chinese state security. He was released and voted most influential artist worldwide. I have seen graffiti in support of Pussy Riot here in Vienna in the last few days. One at newly renovated Geology Institute. Not very nice. And there was some kind of happening at the Vienna Russian Orthodox church, I heard. Church authorities not amused. Well, hopefully worldwide support can help enough this time. Quite recently, many political prisoners in China have been sentenced to more than 10 years. There was a lot of attention abroad in one case. And a Nobel.

Austria is a nice place, generally. Sometimes it’s uglier than Germany. Generally uglier, in terms of police abusing, even killing people, always getting away with it. Have been reading Vienna Review and Poetry Salzburg Review in the last few days. News and poetry. Many of our friends here in Vienna are not from Austria. Coming from abroad often provides a clearer perspective.

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Aug. 14

Read two good books. Not in Chinese. Ok, in Chinese I’m reading poetry. And other books, not enough. Anyway. Cornelia Travnicek and Manfred Nowak. Both in German. Non-Fiction and Fiction. No connection. Like Liao Yiwu 廖亦武, Bei Ling 貝嶺 and that Berlin novel, what was it called? Plan D. Ok, there was a connection. Taipei Bookfair 台北國際書展. Ok or not, no connection. A novel. Punks in Austria. Young and female. Male protagonists dead or dying. Ok, not all of them. Anyway, good novel. Vienna, occupied, death, youth, love, society, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s. 2012 exhibition at Wien Museum. Empathy. And the other book? Torture. Human Rights, UN, Austria, torture in Austria (see this newspaper report, also in German), Moldavia, Equatorial-Guinea or how do you call that country, Uruguay and so on. Neglect. Conditions of/for empathy. Ok, so both books are about empathy. Good. And in German. Oh well, maybe some people who read this read German. Or they’ll get translated. The books, not you. Manfred Nowak’s books and other written sources are available in several other languages than German. You can get some very useful stuff in English for free here.


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